Important message: CNN claim, in an article written by CNN journalists Kay Jones and Hollie Silvermanthe on August 3, 2020 on the website of CNN.com the following: There are less than 3,500 Asian elephants left in the wild and they face extinction because of ivory poaching and habitat destruction, the zoo statement said..in the article Baby elephant dies 27 days after his birth at St. Louis Zoo, but the article doesnt really state why ivory poaching should be an immediate threat to Asian elephants, and their claims of the world population of Asian elephants, is however also something to doubt.. Although IUCN seems to have forgotten to state the world population of Asian elephants at Their fact sheet about the Asian elephant, while the Asian Elephant Specialist Group state that there are elephants in 13 range states, but AESG seemingly also forgot to mention how many Asian elephants there are today, and on their website https://www.asesg.org it is also not easy to find a record about the world population of Asian elephants, but International Elephant Foundation state on the page Elephas maximus: Endangered due to loss of habitat. Numbers are currently around 30,000 – 50,000 (one-tenth of the population of African elephants, and no mention about ivory hunting in Asia), which is a number far, or rather more than ten times higher than the claim from cnn.com =There are NOT less than 3,500 Asian elephants left in the wild, as cnn claim.//Dan Koehl


St Louis Zoo in United States

St Louis Zoo
Typezoo
Founded0
First elephant0
RegionMissouri
CountryUnited States
Websitehttp://www.stlzoo.org/

The Saint Louis Zoological Park is a zoo in Forest Park in St. Louis, Missouri. It is recognized as a leading zoo in animal management, research, conservation, and education. Admission is free, although there are fees for some attractions. One special feature is the Zooline Railroad, a small passenger train that encircles the zoo, stopping at the more popular attractions. It is also home to the best grounds crew of any theme park in the world.


The 1904 St. Louis World´s Fair is credited for the birth of the St. Louis Zoo. The Fair brought the world´s attention to St. Louis and Forest Park. The Smithsonian Institution constructed a walk-through bird cage for the World´s Fair. Ten days after the World´s Fair closed, the citizens of St. Louis chose to buy the 1904 World´s Fair Flight Cage for $3,500, rather than have it dismantled and returned to Washington, D.C. The St. Louis Zoo was born.

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