Important message: CNN claim, in an article written by CNN journalists Kay Jones and Hollie Silvermanthe on August 3, 2020 on the website of CNN.com the following: There are less than 3,500 Asian elephants left in the wild and they face extinction because of ivory poaching and habitat destruction, the zoo statement said..in the article Baby elephant dies 27 days after his birth at St. Louis Zoo, but the article doesnt really state why ivory poaching should be an immediate threat to Asian elephants, and their claims of the world population of Asian elephants, is however also something to doubt.. Although IUCN seems to have forgotten to state the world population of Asian elephants at Their fact sheet about the Asian elephant, while the Asian Elephant Specialist Group state that there are elephants in 13 range states, but AESG seemingly also forgot to mention how many Asian elephants there are today, and on their website https://www.asesg.org it is also not easy to find a record about the world population of Asian elephants, but International Elephant Foundation state on the page Elephas maximus: Endangered due to loss of habitat. Numbers are currently around 30,000 – 50,000 (one-tenth of the population of African elephants, and no mention about ivory hunting in Asia), which is a number far, or rather more than ten times higher than the claim from cnn.com =There are NOT less than 3,500 Asian elephants left in the wild, as cnn claim.//Dan Koehl


Elephant Tetanus

Clostridium tetani

Tetanus, also called lockjaw, is a medical condition characterized by a prolonged contraction of skeletal muscle fibers. The primary symptoms are caused by tetanospasmin, a neurotoxin produced by the Gram-positive, obligate anaerobic bacterium Clostridium tetani.

Clostridium tetani is more common in the tropics, and can be found in soil, and feces of horse, humans and cattle.

Infection generally occurs through wound contamination, and often involves a cut or deep anaearobic puncture wound. As the infection progresses, body temperature increase, muscle spasms in the jaw develop, hence the name lockjaw. This is followed by difficulty in swallowing and general muscle stiffness and spasms in other parts of the body. Often the elephant has to be supported by a sling, in order to stand up.

Treatment include wound cleaning and draining, and penicillin or antibiotics.

Infection can be prevented by proper immunization (vaccination) and by post-exposure prophylaxis.

4 Deceased elephants due to Tetanus.

NameSpecies
Sex
OriginAgeBirthDeath dateDeath reasonParentsArrival
Death location
+ -Sri Thong-EM
F
?2012-03-20disease
tetanus infection
x 2012-02-29
TECC (Thai Elephant Conservation Center Hospital and National Elephant Institute)
+ -Bobby-EM
M
unknown3819702008euthanised
tetanus from a wound in the foot
x 1991-02-00
Natal Zoo Lion Park
+ -Tess (Tessie)-EM
F
wild?1940-09-27disease
Tetanus and Lung problems
x 1939-00-00
Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus
+ -Emperor-EM
M
wild?1885-05-17disease
Tetanus
x 1895-00-00
Ringling Brothers Circus


     
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